McCall’s Continues to Serve the DIY Fashionista

As Paris, New York, London, and Milan get ready for this autumn’s Fashion Week, another branch of the fashion industry is on the alert for the latest trends: it’s McCall’s Pattern Company. In a recent article for the New York Times, columnist Steve Kurutz reminds readers that globe-hopping fashionistas aren’t the only ones interested in the lines of the international fashion houses. DIY sewists also insist upon being kept in the haute-couture loop. McCall’s has been publishing dressmaking patterns for them since 1870 (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/04/fashion/mccalls-pattern-company-sewing-do-it-yourself.html?_r=0).
McCall’s actually began as a lady’s magazine in 1863, eventually becoming one of the twentieth century’s most popular glossy periodicals for women. But while the magazine finally ceased publication in 2002, the dressmaking aspect of the company is still going strong. McCall’s creates patterns for home sewists, publishing an average of 700 new designs every year. McCall’s features four different lines of fashion: McCall’s, Butterick (targeting the vintage market), Kwik Sew, and Vogue Patterns. (The Vogue brand belongs to Conde Nast, but it has been licensed to McCall’s.) Over the decades Vogue Patterns has featured designs by Givenchy, Christian Dior, and Valentino, allowing the home sewist to wear couture style without having to pay exorbitant prices for it. About half of the patterns in this line are licensed from such well-known companies as Tracy Reese and Rachel Comey.
With the increasing resources available over the internet, McCall’s is now using sites like Pinterest, Facebook, and Instagram, posting its most popular patterns from the past to emphasize its lasting legacy. McCall’s has also begun selling downloadable patterns, bypassing its traditional market in fabric stores.

L’Oreal Plans to Acquire IT Cosmetics for a Record $1.2 Billion

L’Oreal SA will purchase IT Cosmetics for a Record $1.2 billion in one of its biggest acquisitions in eight years. Through this acquisition, the firm will add over 300 makeup and skin-care products to its inventory. IT Cosmetics funded by TSG Consumer Partners, will fall under L’Oreal’s Luxe Division. IT Cosmetics will retain its operation in New Jersey City, where its main offices are headquartered.

Long-term growth plan

The new acquisition is part of L’Oreal’s growth plan as the firm has started to experience modest growth in some parts of Latin America and Asia. The fashion giant was co-founded back in 2008 by a beauty-pageant winner and former television news presenter. In a recent official statement to its customers, IT Cosmetics announced that it had recorded a 56 percent increase in sales to $182 million in the financial year ended in June. Therefore, the firm has registered a growth of around $1 million since 2010. It has earned the loyalty of many clients and transitioned to one of the most recognized brands across the globe. L’Oreal USA’s head, Frederic Roze, is hopeful that the brand will continue to grow.

About L’Oreal

L’Oreal is a firm headquartered in Paris that is investing heavily in North America to offset a slowdown in Brazil and Hong Kong. The company has acquired IT Cosmetics as a way of diversifying its services and expanding its operation.

The deal is a success for TSG Consumer Partners, an independent asset management firm worth nearly $5 billion. The company has cemented a top position in the finance service and investment industry by financing consumer brands. Currently, the company is diversifying its beauty and fashion portfolio.

The Booming Market for Plus-Size Fashion

Plus-size fashionistas rejoice. There’s a growing boom in the fashion industry for plus-sized clothing and designs.

For years, trendy retailers and designers have ignored the plus-size market, leaving bigger women to shop at expensive specialty stores or to resign themselves to wearing frumpy, dowdy clothing.

Now, however, high-profile designers like Christian Siriano are creating fun, fashionable items for women of all sizes. Siriano, who won the fourth season of “Project Runway,” recently collaborated on a line of clothing with retailer Lane Bryant, which focuses on women who are sizes 14 and up.

Other retailers, such as Igigi, Eloquii and Kiyonna have spent years conquering the online market for cute plus-sized clothing.

Several big retailers are joining in. In 2015, Target launched its own line of trendy plus-size clothing with Ava & Viv. In department stores, shoppers can now find plus-size offerings from the likes of Anne Klein, Donna Karan, Oscar de la Renta and Tommy Hilfiger.

Why the sudden rush to tap into this previously ignored market? Money, of course. The size of the average woman in the United States is now a 12, with half of all women over 20 a size 12 or up. Many of these women are younger professionals who want the same fashion choices as their thinner compatriots. That hunger has created a clothing industry worth $17 billion — and growing — in yearly sales.