Wet Seal Failing to Deliver Fun Fashions

Wet Seal may be the next in line for inventory liquidation, just like their contemporaries, dELiA*s and DEB Shops. Many fashion retailers seem to be having some issues addressing the desires of modern women.

Wet Seal, a former staple of the 1990’s shopping mall, may be the next victim in this failing generation of clothing retailers. Bank of America, the company’s lender, has begun to carefully scrutinize their cash flow in the wake of reportedly low earnings.

The executive responsible for overseeing store operations issued their resignation on Friday, following a dismal 5 cents per stock-share closing price. It would be a prudent move for  Tom Rothman and Wet Seal to further rethink their staffing plans at the corporate level. Current executives are clearly out of touch with the climate of today’s fashion market.

The company recently settled a discrimination lawsuit, based upon evidence that they systematically transferred black employees to lower-volume stores. Wet Seal consented to pay $7.5 million in damages, an expenditure scarcely affordable.

Compared to their primary competitors like Forever 21 and Charlotte Russo, it’s clear that Wet Seal has some improvements to make. The company needs to embrace the fashion ideals of young women today: fun, diversity and individualism.

3-D Printing Poised to Revolutionize Fashion Industry

The design studio Nervous System has made a breakthrough in the use of 3-D printing technology in the field of clothing. We have all seen the YouTube videos of someone shooting a gun where at least some of the parts were 3D printed. Typically, any time 3-D printed products that are featured are hard and rigid in nature. The technology, however, is advancing. Until now, clothes made through this technology wore more like suits of armor than clothes.

Enter Nervous System design studio and their custom software called Kinematics. This software has refined the printing of the plastic used in 3-D printing to a sufficient degree that it can actually be used to make a dress. By dress I do not mean some rigid thing that just hangs off some poor model. A video of it shows that it moves and flows on and around her as she walks in it. An amazing step forward for the printing of clothing. At a current $3,000 a pop, though, sweat shop workers in Bangladesh can consider their employment safe at the moment. The technology will of course improve. That seems to be the one constant of technology in any field.

Will we soon all have the equivalent of “replicators” from Star Trek in our homes (obviously a joke, right Sam Tabar)? A device will contain some source material (plastic or something else) and when we tell it we need a spatula it just prints it out right there.

J.Crew Gets Helps from 4-Year-Old Fashion Designer

Mayhem, a designer who is only 4 years old, has gained lots of attention because of her paper dresses. The dresses are made from construction paper, tape and scissors. Mayhem’s mother started an Instagram page for her, which helped her designs to catch the eye of popular fashion brands like J.Crew. 

The popular fashion company has asked Mayhem to participate in creating the Crewcuts like, which will be available in the spring of 2015. The line will consists of clothing, shoes and accessories. Mayhem creates the dresses from paper, rhinestones and gift wrapping tape, and J.Crew turns the paper designs into actual clothing. 

Jenny Cooper, the head of Crewcuts Designs, states that she knows people may be a little surprised that the company is working with such a young designer. We may need to bring in Brian Torchin ’cause she’s knocking the socks off of everyone with her remarkable talent and skill.

Plastic- The Clothing Material of the Future?

3D printers usage is on the rise with a wide variety of items that can be created all using one complex machine. The newest advance in 3D printing technology is the creation of fabric made entirely out of plastic. The material ebbs and flows like another other piece of material currently found on store racks. A new and innovative software called Kinematics is responsible for the discovery.

I follow an interesting guy on Twitter, Mark Ahn, who retweeted about how there is great potential by utilizing plastic in clothing for many reasons. Plastic is inexpensive and could be bought by low income families who are on a tight budget. Ever heard of recyclable clothing? Plastic is 100% recyclable so when people tire of wearing a piece of clothing or it gets ruined it will no longer end up in a landfill.